Home » Posts tagged "Hypoplastic posterior fossa"

Star Wars – The Last Jedi & Chiari for Christmas

  This week, Damon and Ben got to preview Star Wars – The Last Jedi, and they loved it. A few months ago, Ben was diagnosed with Arnold Chiari Malformation with a 4mm tonsillar dissension. This means his brain is being pushed into his spinal cord by 4mm.  At 5mm you are considered surgical by almost all neurosurgeons, especially if you are symptomatic. I have/had Chiari and had brain surgery or decompression surgery in 2013. Technically I had no tonsillar dissension because my Chiari was caused by a skull malformation called hypoplastic posterior fossa. It is genetic, and several family members have it, including my son. Surgery saved my life, but so much damage had been done, that I will never be healthy, and am considered to have traumatic brain injury from high pressure in my brain. My pituitary failed, and several nerves were damaged, including my vagus nerve, which...
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I am Free!

I am finally released from bed rest and strict limitations on my activity. I can even drive. Today is a glorious day. I saw my doctor on Monday, and am healing slowly but surely. They are still concerned that my wound has not fully closed, and about the possibility of infection, but I am careful, and they will continue to monitor that. However, I have reached the glorious mark of six-weeks, and my doctor officially declared that I can start to resume normal activity and even drive my car as long as I don’t feel impaired. He’s even insisting that I taper off of medications. Hurray! Mostly I am a fan of being able to drive again. Driving is so linked to independence. I couldn’t go to the doctor without a ride, and I couldn’t do a lot of the things I normally do to help my family, like grocery...
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So I had Brain Surgery

I believe in miracles. I went to my endocrinologist, and he had a new Physicians Assistant. She had worked for a brilliant neurosurgeon who happens to practice in Las Vegas and treats a condition called Chiari Malformations. She looked at my history, and thought it would be worth a call to her old boss to see if my set of odd symptoms fit into this chiari pattern, which they do. Two days later, I was in front of the neurosurgeon. Two days after that I had the advanced and very technical MRI that showed significant pressure increases in my brain and a congenital brain defect called hypoplastic posterior fossa that put pressure on many parts of my brain and may have had a key role in my pituitary gland failing. At this point, the surgeon, Dr. Seiff, decided that I was a candidate for this surgery. His first question was...
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